Visiting the Battlefield

Updated: Jul 11

We are often asked about visiting the Buffington Island battlefield, so we thought we would put together a "visitor's guide" of sorts to refer folks to when they have questions.


The Buffington Island battlefield itself is not on an island, the action was fought over 1,200 acres of land in what is known as the Portland Bottoms, the battlefield being roughly two miles in length (south to north) and one mile in width. The Buffington Island Battlefield Memorial Park only represents a tiny portion of the battlefield (four acres). We (the Buffington Island Battlefield Preservation Foundation) are not the owners or managers of the Buffington Island Battlefield Memorial Park. The property is owned by the State of Ohio, and the Ohio History Connection is in charge of the property.


We are also not the folks who run the nearby Portland Civil War Museum. The museum is managed by our friends at the Portland Community Center.


Before Making Your Visit:

Before visiting the battlefield, consider reading a bit about the battle to familiarize yourself with the story and those who were involved with this battle. We highly recommend David L. Mowery's Morgan's Great Raid: The Remarkable Expedition from Kentucky to Ohio (History Press, 2013). Looking to drive a bit of the John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail on your route to the battlefield? Mr. Mowery teamed up with Lora Schmidt Cahill to provide a detailed turn by turn guide, entitled Morgan's Raid Across Ohio: The Civil War Guidebook of the John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail (Ohio Historical Society, 2014). There are also other titles related to the raid and the the battle, including Lester V. Horwitz's The Longest Raid of the Civil War: Little-Known & Untold Stories of Morgan's Raid into Kentucky, Indiana & Ohio (Farmcourt, 1999). Having some knowledge of the raid and the battle will enhance your visit to Buffington Island.


Looking for something about John H. Morgan? The best biography of the Confederate commander is still James A. Ramage's Rebel Raider: The Life of General John Hunt Morgan (University of Kentucky Press, 1986).


Getting There:

Located in the eastern portion of Meigs County, the battlefield lies along both sides of Ohio State Route 124, a designated Ohio Scenic Byway. The battlefield is a manageable daytrip from several major cities:


Cincinnati - Three hours using a combination of the Appalachian Highway (Ohio State Route 32) and Ohio State Route 124.

Charleston - One hour using Interstate 77, U. S. 33, and Ohio 124.

Cleveland - Three and a half hours using Interstate 77, U. S. 33, and Ohio 124.

Columbus - Two hours using U. S. 33 and Ohio 124.

Lexington - Three and a half hours using Interstate 64, West Virginia State Route 2, U. S. 33, and Ohio 124.

Pittsburgh - Three and a quarter hours using Interstates 79, 70, and 77, U. S. 33, and Ohio 124.

Wheeling - Two and a quarter hours using Interstates 70 and 77, U. S. 33, and Ohio 124.


What to See:

Now that you have arrived, what is there to take in? In the memorial park there are several historical markers and interpretive panels. Most of the markers are related to the battle, but there are a few that are not. The interpretive kiosk is a newer addition to the park, and provides a fairly comprehensive overview of the Great Raid. The park also has a monument that commemorates the battle, the death of Major Daniel McCook, the family that donated the land for the memorial park, and the Moundbuilder culture that created the small mound that is within the park's boundaries. There is another small monument dedicated to those who helped to form the park to preserve the mound as well.


The park has a picnic pavilion and primitive toilets. There is no water available in the park.


While you are at the park, be certain to pick up a copy of the driving tour brochure that should be available. The driving tour consists of nine stops, many that have interpretive panels, to provide you with a more enhanced understanding of the movements of troops and the actions that took place at each stop.


Plan on spending an hour or two visiting the area, especially if you take the driving tour.


Lodging & Dining:

While we are not travel agents, using the power of the World Wide Web, we have selected some of the highest rated places to stay and dine within the region. Of course the are numerous choices depending on how close one wants to be to the battlefield.

Ravenswood, West Virginia (9 miles)

Las Fajitas Mexican Grill

The Dawg Pound


Racine, Ohio (11.7 miles)

Sikorski's Family Restaurant


Chester, Ohio (15.9 miles)

Summerfields Restaurant


Ripley, West Virginia (20.1 miles)

Downtowner Restaurant

Holiday Inn Express and Suites

Pete's Hot Dogs

Super 8 by Wyndham

Pomeroy, Ohio (21.5 miles)

Court Grill

Fox's Pizza Den

River Roasters Coffee Company


Middleport, Ohio (26.1 miles)

Corner Restaurant

Millie's Restaurant and Bakery


Parkersburg, West Virginia (34.2 miles)

Cheryl's Country Diner

Hampton Inn & Suites

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

Los Trancas Mexican Cantina

Mary's B's Diner

Motel 6

Sleep Inn & Suites

The Root Beer Shack

Towne Place Suites by Marriot

Wingate by Wyndham


Mineral Wells, West Virginia (36.3 miles)

Chef Chen's

Comfort Suites

Hampton Inn

Holiday Inn Express

Microtel Inn & Suites by Wyndham

Pete's Pizza


Athens, Ohio (40.3 miles)

Ciro Italian Kitchen & Bar

Dynasty Restaurant

El Camino

Jackie O's Public House Restaurant

Miller's Chicken

O'Betty's Red Hot

Purple Chopstix

Restaurant Salaam

Super 8 by Wyndham

Tavolino

Union Street Diner

Zoe


Gallipolis, Ohio (41.4 miles)

Five Rivers Indian Cuisine

Hampton Inn

Lorobi's Pizza

Quality Inn

Remo's Italian Hot Dogs

Super 8 by Wyndham

Travelodge by Wyndham

Tuscany Italian Restaurant

Zack & Scotty's

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